mk6ve
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Re: Using PiSI/eopkg

Thu Jan 14, 2016 10:47 am

What about upgrading the 'third party' packages, am I safe to just build the new version and eopkg install over current version?

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Justin
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Re: Using PiSI/eopkg

Fri Jan 15, 2016 3:20 am

mk6ve wrote:am I safe to just build the new version and eopkg install over current version?
Yes. In time we'll implement an upgrade path so you're able to upgrade like you are with items in the normal repo.

mk6ve
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Re: Using PiSI/eopkg

Fri Jan 15, 2016 12:23 pm

That's fine, thanks! Was just wondering whether _eopkg it_ is the right way to upgrade from local packages or whether it would break something.

me245
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Re: Using PiSI/eopkg

Fri Feb 19, 2016 4:28 pm

Migrating from yum, is there an option along the lines of yum provides pkg? or is the repo search more rubust than yum in that eopkg sr lib will provide the package that provides that library?


***Edit --- I found what I was looking for. using 'pisi search-file library' will provide what package provides that library. posting for posterity

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Justin
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Re: Using PiSI/eopkg

Fri Feb 19, 2016 11:31 pm

me245 wrote:***Edit --- I found what I was looking for. using 'pisi search-file library' will provide what package provides that library. posting for posterity
This only searches packages installed on your system. There's no current way to search all packages available.

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TNFrank
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Re: Using PiSI/eopkg

Sat Mar 12, 2016 6:32 pm

So is pisi(do you say it as piesee?) the preferred method or is eopkg the way you should do updates/upgrades in Terminal? I've been using pisi to do installs and upgrades.
"You know what the difference between me and you really is? You look
out there and see a horde of evil, brain eating zombies. I look out there
and see a target rich environment"
-Dillis D. Freeman Jr

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Justin
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Re: Using PiSI/eopkg

Sat Mar 12, 2016 10:23 pm

You can use whichever is more comfortable, most people just use the Software Center but if you feel more comfortable in a terminal then you can use eopkg (or pisi).

Gabochuky
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Re: Using PiSI/eopkg

Sat Jul 23, 2016 11:42 pm

Does pisi have any command to remove packages that are not being used (orphans)? Something in the lines of "sudo apt autoremove" to give an example.

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Justin
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Re: Using PiSI/eopkg

Sun Jul 24, 2016 12:39 am

Auto removing packages on any OS is dangerous and thus isn't implemented in eopkg. There are lots of packages that aren't depended on like bash and if you remove that, the whole system breaks.

Mecki
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Re: Using PiSI/eopkg

Wed Aug 10, 2016 4:25 pm

Justin wrote:Auto removing packages on any OS is dangerous and thus isn't implemented in eopkg.

Auto removing packages is only dangerous when you are doing it wrong. I've never seen any big distro breaking after doing an auto remove, have you?

A typical case for auto remove: LibreOffice. It consists out of single packages, like libreoffice-writer, libreoffice-calc, libreoffice-impress, and so on. But all these packages require libreoffice-common to be installed, it's a dependency. No user will ever install libreoffice-common himself though, as on its own this packet servers no purpose. So no matter what package you install, libreoffice-common gets installed as well. Yet if you remove the installed package again, libreoffice-common stays installed.

An auto-remove function in other distros would see that
  • libreoffice-common itself was only installed to satisfy a dependency of another package
  • No installed package still requires libreoffice-common
Result: Bye bye package. And this is totally safe.
Justin wrote:There are lots of packages that aren't depended on like bash and if you remove that, the whole system breaks.
  1. If a package requires bash to run, it should list bash as dependency. Otherwise it would not run on systems that have no bash installed and having bash installed is not a requirement on any Linux system.
  2. Auto-remove never considers packages as removable, that the user has installed explicitly. Of course, this means the package system must remember why a package was installed (e.g. on user request or just to resolve some dependency).
  3. Packages installed during system installation would be considered "installed on user request", unless they are only there to satisfy dependencies of other packages. Otherwise running auto-remove after a fresh system install would destroy pretty much all of the system again and I've never seen that happening on other systems.
  4. There can be a blacklist of non-auto-removable packets containing all the packets that the system considers core and that would break the system itself if being auto removed. I don't know if other systems have such a list but it seems meaningful to me and thus I wouldn't be surprised if they do. Actually you would also check manual removes against that list and warn users if they seem to do something really stupid.
Auto-remove is totally safe on all systems that offer it, so I see no reason why it cannot be safe with Solus. And in the attempt of making a distro as simple as possible, and that seems to be one of the design goals of Solus, it's an important missing feature to aid Linux beginners with package management.

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